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Sunday, 26 June 2011

NOTES ON VARIOUS ART MOVEMENTS SINCE THE MIDDLE OF THE 19th CENTURY.

ACTION PAINTING



Sometimes used as an alternative term for Abstract Expressionism.

In 1952, the critic Harold Rosenberg invented this term to emphasise the sheer physical activity involved in the creation of the large, spontaneously executed, abstract expressionist paintings like those of Jackson Pollock and Franz Kline among others. In this sort of work, the paint is dripped, splashed and poured over the canvas, which is often laid on the floor rather than placed upright. 
Occasionally buckets of paint were literally hurled at the canvasses, letting a completely random result stand for fine art. 

JACKSON POLLOCK   Convergence, 1952

FRANZ KLINE   New York, 1953

Free Form, 1946

Jackson Pollock (American, 1912-1956)


One: Number 31, 1950

Jackson Pollock (American, 1912-1956)


NAÏVE OR PRIMITIVE ART



Originally used to describe the work of untrained artists who, nevertheless, had some innate ability. Some artists have, however, taken up the style, and it has become a more recognisable school. Among the best-known genuine naives are Grandma Moses in the USA, Douanier Rousseau in France, and Alfred Wallis in England. Modern naives include Beryl Cook and Martin Leman.
Naïve artists are not necessarily untrained or amateurs. Sophisticated artists may also deliberately affect a naïve style. 
BERYL COOK   Dining Out
BERYL COOK, In the Snug
HENRI ROUSSEAU  

Tiger in a Tropical Storm 1891


(Sometimes called Surprised )
ALFRED WALLIS
(The Hold House Port Mear Square Island Port Mear Beach, 1932)
GRANDMA MOSES    Halloween, 1955
GRANDMA MOSES    Let Me help 




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